Posts Tagged gamma ray

Recent Postings from gamma ray

Interpreting the Fermi-LAT gamma ray excess in the simplified framework

We test the plausibility that a Majorana fermion dark matter candidate with a scalar mediator explains the gamma ray excess from the Galactic center. Assuming that the mediator couples to all third generation fermions we calculate observables for dark matter abundance and scattering on nuclei, gamma, positron, and anti-proton cosmic ray fluxes, radio emission from dark matter annihilation, and the effect of dark matter annihilations on the CMB. After discarding the controversial radio observation the rest of the data prefers a dark matter (mediator) mass in the 10-100 (3-1000) GeV region and weakly correlated couplings to bottom quarks and tau leptons with values of 10^{-3}-1 at the 68\% credibility level.

Constraints on Lorentz Invariance Violation with gamma-ray bursts via a Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach

In quantum theory of gravity, we expect the Lorentz Invariance Violation (LIV) and the modification of the dispersion relation between energy and momentum for photons. The effect of the energy-dependent velocity due to the modified dispersion relation for photons was studied in the standard cosmological context by using a sample of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). In this paper we mainly discuss the possible LIV effect by using different cosmological models for the accelerating universe. Due to the degeneracies among model parameters, the GRBs’ time delay data are combined with the cosmic microwave background data from the Planck first year release, the baryon acoustic oscillation data at six different redshifts, as well as Union2 type Ia supernovae data, to constrain both the model parameters and the LIV effect. We find no evidence of LIV.

Investigation of Correction Method of the Spacecraft Low Altitude Ranging

gamma ray altitude control system is an important equipment for deep space exploration and sample return mission, its main purpose is a low altitude measurement of the spacecraft based on Compton Effect at the moment when it lands on extraterrestrial celestial or sampling returns to the Earth land, and an ignition altitude correction of the spacecraft retrograde landing rocket at different landing speeds. This paper presents an ignition altitude correction method of the spacecraft at different landing speeds, based on the number of particles gamma ray reflected field gradient graded. Through the establishment of a theoretical model, its algorithm feasibility is proved by a mathematical derivation and verified by an experiment, and also the adaptability of the algorithm under different parameters is described. The method provides a certain value for landing control of the deep space exploration spacecraft landing the planet surface.

Galactic center GeV gamma-ray excess from dark matter with gauged lepton numbers

The recently observed excess in gamma-ray signal near the Galactic center suggests that dark matter particles may annihilate into charged fermions that produce gamma-ray to be observed. In this paper, we consider a leptonic dark matter, which annihilates into the standard model leptons, $\mu^+ \mu^-$ and $\tau^+ \tau^-$, by the interaction of the gauged lepton number ${\rm U(1)}_{L_\mu-L_\tau}$ and fits the observed excess. Interestingly, the necessary annihilation cross section for the observed gamma-ray flux provides a good fit to the value for the relic abundance of dark matter. We identify the preferred parameter space of the model after taking the existing experimental constraints from the precision measurements including the muon $(g-2)$, tau decay, neutrino trident production, dark matter direct detection, and the LHC experiments.

Galactic center GeV gamma-ray excess from dark matter with gauged lepton numbers [Cross-Listing]

The recently observed excess in gamma-ray signal near the Galactic center suggests that dark matter particles may annihilate into charged fermions that produce gamma-ray to be observed. In this paper, we consider a leptonic dark matter, which annihilates into the standard model leptons, $\mu^+ \mu^-$ and $\tau^+ \tau^-$, by the interaction of the gauged lepton number ${\rm U(1)}_{L_\mu-L_\tau}$ and fits the observed excess. Interestingly, the necessary annihilation cross section for the observed gamma-ray flux provides a good fit to the value for the relic abundance of dark matter. We identify the preferred parameter space of the model after taking the existing experimental constraints from the precision measurements including the muon $(g-2)$, tau decay, neutrino trident production, dark matter direct detection, and the LHC experiments.

Broadband X-ray Properties of the Gamma-ray Binary 1FGL J1018.6-5856

We report on NuSTAR, XMM-Newton and Swift observations of the gamma-ray binary 1FGL J1018.6-5856. We measure the orbital period to be 16.544+/-0.008 days using Swift data spanning 1900 days. The orbital period is different from the 2011 gamma-ray measurement which was used in the previous X-ray study of An et al. (2013) using ~400 days of Swift data, but is consistent with a new gamma-ray solution reported in 2014. The light curve folded on the new period is qualitatively similar to that reported previously, having a spike at phase 0 and broad sinusoidal modulation. The X-ray flux enhancement at phase 0 occurs more regularly in time than was previously suggested. A spiky structure at this phase seems to be a persistent feature, although there is some variability. Furthermore, we find that the source flux clearly correlates with the spectral hardness throughout all orbital phases, and that the broadband X-ray spectra measured with NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Swift are well fit with an unbroken power-law model. This spectrum suggests that the system may not be accretion-powered.

Broadband X-ray Properties of the Gamma-ray Binary 1FGL J1018.6-5856 [Replacement]

We report on NuSTAR, XMM-Newton and Swift observations of the gamma-ray binary 1FGL J1018.6-5856. We measure the orbital period to be 16.544+/-0.008 days using Swift data spanning 1900 days. The orbital period is different from the 2011 gamma-ray measurement which was used in the previous X-ray study of An et al. (2013) using ~400 days of Swift data, but is consistent with a new gamma-ray solution reported in 2014. The light curve folded on the new period is qualitatively similar to that reported previously, having a spike at phase 0 and broad sinusoidal modulation. The X-ray flux enhancement at phase 0 occurs more regularly in time than was previously suggested. A spiky structure at this phase seems to be a persistent feature, although there is some variability. Furthermore, we find that the source flux clearly correlates with the spectral hardness throughout all orbital phases, and that the broadband X-ray spectra measured with NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Swift are well fit with an unbroken power-law model. This spectrum suggests that the system may not be accretion-powered.

Gamma Ray Burst as Sources of Exotic Particles

We consider the possible production of stable lightest first level KK particle (LKP) in baryonic gamma ray bursts (GRB) out flows. We numerically computed the energy-dependent cross-sections of Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitations for the Standard Model gauge bosons, photon and Z. Next, we determined the feasibility of producing these KK excitations in gamma-ray emitting regions of GRBs. We found that a GRB fireball that accelerates baryons to energies greater than 10^14 eV could produce KK excitations out to approximately 10^12 cm from the central engine, indicating that GRBs may be a significant source of the LKP. Finally, we explore the potential observational consequences of our results.

Gamma Ray Burst as Sources of Exotic Particles [Cross-Listing]

We consider the possible production of stable lightest first level KK particle (LKP) in baryonic gamma ray bursts (GRB) out flows. We numerically computed the energy-dependent cross-sections of Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitations for the Standard Model gauge bosons, photon and Z. Next, we determined the feasibility of producing these KK excitations in gamma-ray emitting regions of GRBs. We found that a GRB fireball that accelerates baryons to energies greater than 10^14 eV could produce KK excitations out to approximately 10^12 cm from the central engine, indicating that GRBs may be a significant source of the LKP. Finally, we explore the potential observational consequences of our results.

Simulating the 21cm forest detectable with LOFAR and SKA in the spectra of high-z GRBs

We investigate the feasibility of detecting 21cm absorption features in the afterglow spectra of high redshift long Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). This is done employing simulations of cosmic reionization, together with the instrumental characteristics of the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR). We find that absorption features could be marginally (with a S/N larger than a few) detected by LOFAR at z>7 if the GRB originated from PopIII stars, while the detection would be easier if the noise were reduced by one order of magnitude, i.e. similar to what is expected for the first phase of the Square Kilometer Array (SKA1-low). On the other hand, more standard GRBs are too dim to be detected even with ten times the sensitivity of SKA1-low, and only in the most optimistic case can a S/N larger than a few be reached at z>9.

Physical properties of the gamma-ray binary LS 5039 through low and high frequency radio observations

We have studied in detail the 0.15-15 GHz radio spectrum of the gamma-ray binary LS 5039 to look for a possible turnover and absorption mechanisms at low frequencies, and to constrain the physical properties of its emission. We have analysed two archival VLA monitorings, all the available archival GMRT data and a coordinated quasi-simultaneous observational campaign conducted in 2013 with GMRT and WSRT. The data show that the radio emission of LS 5039 is persistent on day, week and year timescales, with a variability $\lesssim 25~\%$ at all frequencies, and no signature of orbital modulation. The obtained spectra reveal a power-law shape with a curvature below 5 GHz and a turnover at $\sim0.5$ GHz, which can be reproduced by a one-zone model with synchrotron self-absorption plus Razin effect. We obtain a coherent picture for a size of the emitting region of $\sim0.85~\mathrm{mas}$, setting a magnetic field of $B\sim20~\mathrm{mG}$, an electron density of $n_{\rm e}\sim4\times10^5~{\rm cm^{-3}}$ and a mass-loss rate of $\dot M\sim5\times10^{-8}~{\rm M_{\odot} yr^{-1}}$. These values imply a significant mixing of the stellar wind with the relativistic plasma outflow from the compact companion. At particular epochs the Razin effect is negligible, implying changes in the injection and the electron density or magnetic field. The Razin effect is reported for first time in a gamma-ray binary, giving further support to the young non-accreting pulsar scenario.

The emission of Gamma Ray Bursts as a test-bed for modified gravity

The extreme physical conditions of Gamma Ray Bursts can constitute a useful observational laboratory to test theories of gravity where very high curvature regimes are involved. Here we propose a sort of curvature engine capable, in principle, of explaining the huge energy emission of Gamma Ray Bursts. Specifically, we investigate the emission of radiation by charged particles non-minimally coupled to the gravitational background where higher order curvature invariants are present. The coupling gives rise to an additional force inducing a non-geodesics motion of particles. This fact allows a strong emission of radiation by gravitationally accelerated particles. As we will show with some specific model, the energy emission is of the same order of magnitude of that characterizing the Gamma Ray Burst physics. Alternatively, strong curvature regimes can be considered as a natural mechanism for the generation of highly energetic astrophysical events.

The emission of Gamma Ray Bursts as a test-bed for modified gravity [Cross-Listing]

The extreme physical conditions of Gamma Ray Bursts can constitute a useful observational laboratory to test theories of gravity where very high curvature regimes are involved. Here we propose a sort of curvature engine capable, in principle, of explaining the huge energy emission of Gamma Ray Bursts. Specifically, we investigate the emission of radiation by charged particles non-minimally coupled to the gravitational background where higher order curvature invariants are present. The coupling gives rise to an additional force inducing a non-geodesics motion of particles. This fact allows a strong emission of radiation by gravitationally accelerated particles. As we will show with some specific model, the energy emission is of the same order of magnitude of that characterizing the Gamma Ray Burst physics. Alternatively, strong curvature regimes can be considered as a natural mechanism for the generation of highly energetic astrophysical events.

The emission of Gamma Ray Bursts as a test-bed for modified gravity [Cross-Listing]

The extreme physical conditions of Gamma Ray Bursts can constitute a useful observational laboratory to test theories of gravity where very high curvature regimes are involved. Here we propose a sort of curvature engine capable, in principle, of explaining the huge energy emission of Gamma Ray Bursts. Specifically, we investigate the emission of radiation by charged particles non-minimally coupled to the gravitational background where higher order curvature invariants are present. The coupling gives rise to an additional force inducing a non-geodesics motion of particles. This fact allows a strong emission of radiation by gravitationally accelerated particles. As we will show with some specific model, the energy emission is of the same order of magnitude of that characterizing the Gamma Ray Burst physics. Alternatively, strong curvature regimes can be considered as a natural mechanism for the generation of highly energetic astrophysical events.

Unveiling the population of orphan Gamma Ray Bursts

Gamma Ray Bursts are detectable in the gamma-ray band if their jets are oriented towards the observer. However, for each GRB with a typical theta_jet, there should be ~2/theta_jet^2 bursts whose emission cone is oriented elsewhere in space. These off-axis bursts can be eventually detected when, due to the deceleration of their relativistic jets, the beaming angle becomes comparable to the viewing angle. Orphan Afterglows (OA) should outnumber the current population of bursts detected in the gamma-ray band even if they have not been conclusively observed so far at any frequency. We compute the expected flux of the population of orphan afterglows in the mm, optical and X-ray bands through a population synthesis code of GRBs and the standard afterglow emission model. We estimate the detection rate of OA by on-going and forthcoming surveys. The average duration of OA as transients above a given limiting flux is derived and described with analytical expressions: in general OA should appear as daily transients in optical surveys and as monthly/yearly transients in the mm/radio band. We find that ~ 2 OA yr^-1 could already be detected by Gaia and up to 20 OA yr^-1 could be observed by the ZTF survey. A larger number of 50 OA yr^-1 should be detected by LSST in the optical band. For the X-ray band, ~ 26 OA yr^-1 could be detected by the eROSITA. For the large population of OA detectable by LSST, the X-ray and optical follow up of the light curve (for the brightest cases) and/or the extensive follow up of their emission in the mm and radio band could be the key to disentangle their GRB nature from other extragalactic transients of comparable flux density.

Neutrinos from Gamma Ray Bursts in the IceCube and ARA Era

In this review I discuss the ultra-high energy neutrinos (UHEN) originated from Cosmic-Rays propogation (GZK neutrinos) and from Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs), and discuss their detectability in kilometers scale detectors like ARA and IceCube. While GZK neutrinos are expected from cosmic ray interactions on the CMB, the GRB neutrinos depend on the physics inside the sources. GRBs are predicted to emit UHEN in the prompt and in the later ‘after-glow’ phase. I discuss the constraints on the hadronic component of GRBs derived from the search of four years of IceCube data for a prompt neutrino fux from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and more in general I present the results of the search for high-energy neutrinos interacting within the IceCube detector between 2010 and 2013.

On the sensitivity of CTA to gamma-ray boxes from multi-TeV dark matter

Collider, direct and indirect searches for dark matter have typically little or no sensitivity to weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) with masses above a few TeV. This rather unexplored regime can however be probed through the search for distinctive gamma-ray spectral features produced by the annihilation of WIMPs at very high energies. Here we present a dedicated search for gamma-ray boxes — sharp spectral features that cannot be mimicked by astrophysical sources — with the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). Using realistic projections for the instrument performance and detailed background modelling, a profile likelihood analysis is implemented to derive the expected upper limits and sensitivity reach after 100 h of observations towards a $2^\circ\times2^\circ$ region around the Galactic centre. Our results show that CTA will be able to probe gamma-ray boxes down to annihilation cross sections of $10^{-27}-10^{-26}\,\text{cm}^3\text{/s}$ up to tens of TeV. We also identify a number of concrete particle physics models providing thermal dark matter candidates that can be used as target benchmarks in future search campaigns. This constitutes a golden opportunity for CTA to either discover or rule out multi-TeV thermal dark matter in a corner of parameter space where all other experimental efforts are basically insensitive.

On the sensitivity of CTA to gamma-ray boxes from multi-TeV dark matter [Cross-Listing]

Collider, direct and indirect searches for dark matter have typically little or no sensitivity to weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) with masses above a few TeV. This rather unexplored regime can however be probed through the search for distinctive gamma-ray spectral features produced by the annihilation of WIMPs at very high energies. Here we present a dedicated search for gamma-ray boxes — sharp spectral features that cannot be mimicked by astrophysical sources — with the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). Using realistic projections for the instrument performance and detailed background modelling, a profile likelihood analysis is implemented to derive the expected upper limits and sensitivity reach after 100 h of observations towards a $2^\circ\times2^\circ$ region around the Galactic centre. Our results show that CTA will be able to probe gamma-ray boxes down to annihilation cross sections of $10^{-27}-10^{-26}\,\text{cm}^3\text{/s}$ up to tens of TeV. We also identify a number of concrete particle physics models providing thermal dark matter candidates that can be used as target benchmarks in future search campaigns. This constitutes a golden opportunity for CTA to either discover or rule out multi-TeV thermal dark matter in a corner of parameter space where all other experimental efforts are basically insensitive.

Kanata optical and X-ray monitoring of Gamma-ray emitting Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 and Radio galaxies

Broadband spectrum of AGN consists of multiple components such as jet emission and accretion disk emission. Temporal correlation study is useful to understand emission components and their physical origins. We have performed optical monitoring using Kanata telescope for 4 radio galaxies and 6 radio-loud Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 (RL-NLSy1): 2 gamma-ray-loud RL-NLSy1s, 1H 0323+342 and PMN J0948+0022, and 4 gamma-ray-quiet RL-NLSy1s. From these results, it is suggested that RL-NLSy1s show a disk-dominant phase and a jet-dominant phase in the optical band, but it is not well correlated with brightness.

Pathfinder flight of the Polarized Gamma-ray Observer (PoGOLite) in 2013

The Polarized Gamma-ray Observer (PoGOLite) is a balloon-borne instrument that can measure polarization in the energy range 25–240 keV. The instrument adopts an array of well-type "phoswich" detectors in order to suppress backgrounds. Based on the anisotropy of Compton scattering angles resulting from polarized gamma-rays, the polarization of the observed source can be reconstructed. During July 12-26 of 2013, a successful near-circumpolar pathfinder flight was conducted from Esrange, Sweden, to Norilsk, Russia. During this two-week flight, several observations of the Crab were conducted. Here, we present the PoGOLite instrument and summarize the 2013 flight.

Flaring gamma-ray emission from high redshift blazars

High redshift blazars are among the most powerful objects in the Universe. Although they represent a significant fraction of the extragalactic hard X-ray sky, they are not commonly detected in gamma-rays. High redshift (z>2) objects represent <10 per cent of the AGN population observed by Fermi so far, and gamma-ray flaring activity from these sources is even more uncommon. The characterization of the radio-to-gamma-ray properties of high redshift blazars represent a powerful tool for the study of both the energetics of such extreme objects and the Extragalactic Background Light. We present results of a multi-band campaign on TXS 0536+145, which is the highest redshift flaring gamma-ray blazar detected so far. At the peak of the flare the source reached an apparent isotropic gamma-ray luminosity of 6.6×10^49 erg/s, which is comparable with the luminosity observed from the most powerful blazars. The physical properties derived from the multi-wavelength observations are then compared with those shown by the high redshift population. In addition preliminary results from the high redshift flaring blazar PKS 2149-306 will be discussed.

A unified picture for low-luminosity and long gamma-ray bursts based on the extended progenitor of llgrb 060218/SN 2006aj

The relation between long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) and low-luminosity GRBs (llgrbs) is a long standing puzzle — on the one hand their high energy emission properties are fundamentally different, implying a different gamma-ray source, yet both are associated with similar supernovae of the same peculiar type (broad-line Ic), pointing at a similar progenitor and a similar explosion mechanism. Here we analyze the multi-wavelength data of the particularly well-observed SN 2006aj, associated with llgrb 060218, finding that its progenitor star is sheathed in an extended ($>100R_\odot$), low-mass ($\sim 0.01M_\odot$) envelope. This progenitor structure implies that the gamma-ray emission in this llgrb is generated by a mildly relativistic shock breakout. It also suggests a unified picture for llgrbs and LGRBs, where the key difference is the existence of an extended low-mass envelope in llgrbs and its absence in LGRBs. The same engine, which launches a relativistic jet, can drive the two explosions, but, while in LGRBs the ultra-relativistic jet emerges from the bare progenitor star and produces the observed gamma-rays, in llgrbs the extended envelope smothers the jet and prevents the generation of a large gamma-ray luminosity. Instead, the jet deposits all its energy in the envelope, driving a mildly relativistic shock that upon breakout produces a llgrb. In addition for giving a unified view of the two phenomena, this model provides a natural explanation to many observed properties of llgrbs. It also implies that llgrbs are a viable source of the observed extra-galactic diffuse neutrino flux and that they are promising sources for future gravitational wave detectors.

High-Energy Neutrinos in Light of Fermi-LAT

The production of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos is tightly linked to the emission of hadronic gamma-rays. I will discuss the recent observation of TeV to PeV neutrinos by the IceCube Cherenkov telescope in the context of gamma-ray astronomy. The corresponding energy range of hadronic gamma-rays is not directly accessible by extragalactic gamma-ray astronomy due to interactions with cosmic radiation backgrounds. Nevertheless, the isotropic sub-TeV gamma-ray background observed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) contains indirect information from secondary emission produced in electromagnetic cascades and constrains hadronic emission scenarios. On the other hand, observation of PeV gamma-rays would provide a smoking-gun signal for Galactic emission. In general, the cross-correlation of neutrino emission with (extended) Galactic and extragalactic gamma-ray sources will serve as the most sensitive probe for a future identification of neutrino sources.

A sample of weak blazars at milli-arcsecond resolution

We started a follow-up investigation of the Deep X-ray Radio Blazar Survey objects with declination >-10 deg. We undertook a survey with the EVN at 5GHz to make the first images of a complete sample of weak blazars, aiming at a comparison between high- and low-power samples of blazars. All of the 87 sources observed were detected. Point-like sources are found in 39 cases, and 48 show core-jet structure. According to the spectral indices previously obtained, 58 sources show a flat spectral index, and 29 sources show a steep spectrum or a spectrum peaking at a frequency around 1-2 GHz. Adding to the DXRBS objects we observed those already observed with ATCA in the southern sky, we found that 14 blazars and a SSRQ, are associated to gamma-ray emitters. We found that 56 sources can be considered blazars. We also detected 2 flat spectrum NLRGs. About 50% of the blazars associated to a gamma-ray object are BL Lacs, confirming that they are more likely detected among blazars gamma-emitters. We confirm the correlation found between the source core flux density and the gamma-ray photon fluxes down to fainter flux densities. We also found that weak blazars are also weaker gamma-ray emitters compared to bright blazars. Twenty-two sources are SSRQs or CSSs, and 7 are GPSs. The available X-ray ROSAT observations allow us to suggest that CSS and GPS quasars are not obscured by large column of cold gas surrounding the nuclei. We did not find any significant difference in X-ray luminosity between CSS and GPS quasars.

SUSY Implications from WIMP Annihilation into Scalars at the Galactic Centre [Cross-Listing]

An excess in gamma-rays emanating from the galactic centre has recently been observed in the Fermi-LAT data. This signal can be interpreted as resulting from WIMP annihilation, with the spectrum well-fit by dark matter annihilating dominantly into either bottom-quark or Higgs pairs. Supersymmetric models provide a well-motivated framework to study the implications of this signal in these channels. With a neutralino dark matter candidate, the gamma-ray excess cannot be easily accommodated in the minimal supersymmetric model, which in any case requires tuning below the percent level to explain the observed Higgs mass. Instead we are naturally led to consider the next-to-minimal model with a singlet superfield. This not only allows for the annihilation channel into bottom-quark pairs to be implemented, but also provides new possibilities for annihilation into Higgs-pseudoscalar pairs. We show that the fit to the gamma-ray excess for the Higgs-pseudoscalar channel can be just as good as for annihilation into bottom-quark pairs. Moreover, in the parameter range of interest, the next-to-minimal supersymmetric model solves the mu-problem and can explain the 125 GeV Higgs mass with improved naturalness. We also consider an extension by adding a right-handed neutrino superfield with the right-handed sneutrino acting as a dark matter candidate. Interestingly, this allows for the annihilation into pseudoscalar pairs which also provide a good fit to the gamma-ray excess. Furthermore, in the case of a neutralino LSP, the late decay of a sneutrino NLSP can non-thermally produce the observed relic abundance. Finally, the WIMP annihilation into scalar pairs allows for the possibility of detecting the Higgs or pseudoscalar decay into two photons, providing a smoking-gun signal of the model.

SUSY Implications from WIMP Annihilation into Scalars at the Galactic Centre [Replacement]

An excess in gamma-rays emanating from the galactic centre has recently been observed in the Fermi-LAT data. This signal can be interpreted as resulting from WIMP annihilation, with the spectrum well-fit by dark matter annihilating dominantly into either bottom-quark or Higgs pairs. Supersymmetric models provide a well-motivated framework to study the implications of this signal in these channels. With a neutralino dark matter candidate, the gamma-ray excess cannot be easily accommodated in the minimal supersymmetric model, which in any case requires tuning below the percent level to explain the observed Higgs mass. Instead we are naturally led to consider the next-to-minimal model with a singlet superfield. This not only allows for the annihilation channel into bottom-quark pairs to be implemented, but also provides new possibilities for annihilation into Higgs-pseudoscalar pairs. We show that the fit to the gamma-ray excess for the Higgs-pseudoscalar channel can be just as good as for annihilation into bottom-quark pairs. Moreover, in the parameter range of interest, the next-to-minimal supersymmetric model solves the mu-problem and can explain the 125 GeV Higgs mass with improved naturalness. We also consider an extension by adding a right-handed neutrino superfield with the right-handed sneutrino acting as a dark matter candidate. Interestingly, this allows for the annihilation into pseudoscalar pairs which also provide a good fit to the gamma-ray excess. Furthermore, in the case of a neutralino LSP, the late decay of a sneutrino NLSP can non-thermally produce the observed relic abundance. Finally, the WIMP annihilation into scalar pairs allows for the possibility of detecting the Higgs or pseudoscalar decay into two photons, providing a smoking-gun signal of the model.

SUSY Implications from WIMP Annihilation into Scalars at the Galactic Centre [Replacement]

An excess in gamma-rays emanating from the galactic centre has recently been observed in the Fermi-LAT data. This signal can be interpreted as resulting from WIMP annihilation, with the spectrum well-fit by dark matter annihilating dominantly into either bottom-quark or Higgs pairs. Supersymmetric models provide a well-motivated framework to study the implications of this signal in these channels. With a neutralino dark matter candidate, the gamma-ray excess cannot be easily accommodated in the minimal supersymmetric model, which in any case requires tuning below the percent level to explain the observed Higgs mass. Instead we are naturally led to consider the next-to-minimal model with a singlet superfield. This not only allows for the annihilation channel into bottom-quark pairs to be implemented, but also provides new possibilities for annihilation into Higgs-pseudoscalar pairs. We show that the fit to the gamma-ray excess for the Higgs-pseudoscalar channel can be just as good as for annihilation into bottom-quark pairs. Moreover, in the parameter range of interest, the next-to-minimal supersymmetric model solves the mu-problem and can explain the 125 GeV Higgs mass with improved naturalness. We also consider an extension by adding a right-handed neutrino superfield with the right-handed sneutrino acting as a dark matter candidate. Interestingly, this allows for the annihilation into pseudoscalar pairs which also provide a good fit to the gamma-ray excess. Furthermore, in the case of a neutralino LSP, the late decay of a sneutrino NLSP can non-thermally produce the observed relic abundance. Finally, the WIMP annihilation into scalar pairs allows for the possibility of detecting the Higgs or pseudoscalar decay into two photons, providing a smoking-gun signal of the model.

SUSY Implications from WIMP Annihilation into Scalars at the Galactic Centre

An excess in gamma-rays emanating from the galactic centre has recently been observed in the Fermi-LAT data. This signal can be interpreted as resulting from WIMP annihilation, with the spectrum well-fit by dark matter annihilating dominantly into either bottom-quark or Higgs pairs. Supersymmetric models provide a well-motivated framework to study the implications of this signal in these channels. With a neutralino dark matter candidate, the gamma-ray excess cannot be easily accommodated in the minimal supersymmetric model, which in any case requires tuning below the percent level to explain the observed Higgs mass. Instead we are naturally led to consider the next-to-minimal model with a singlet superfield. This not only allows for the annihilation channel into bottom-quark pairs to be implemented, but also provides new possibilities for annihilation into Higgs-pseudoscalar pairs. We show that the fit to the gamma-ray excess for the Higgs-pseudoscalar channel can be just as good as for annihilation into bottom-quark pairs. Moreover, in the parameter range of interest, the next-to-minimal supersymmetric model solves the mu-problem and can explain the 125 GeV Higgs mass with improved naturalness. We also consider an extension by adding a right-handed neutrino superfield with the right-handed sneutrino acting as a dark matter candidate. Interestingly, this allows for the annihilation into pseudoscalar pairs which also provide a good fit to the gamma-ray excess. Furthermore, in the case of a neutralino LSP, the late decay of a sneutrino NLSP can non-thermally produce the observed relic abundance. Finally, the WIMP annihilation into scalar pairs allows for the possibility of detecting the Higgs or pseudoscalar decay into two photons, providing a smoking-gun signal of the model.

Search for GeV Gamma Ray Bursts with the ARGO-YBJ Detector: Summary of Eight Years of Observations

The search for Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) emission in the energy range 1-100 GeV in coincidence with the satellite detection has been carried out using the Astrophysical Radiation with Ground-based Observatory at YangBaJing (ARGO-YBJ) experiment. The high altitude location (4300 m a.s.l.), the large active surface ($\sim$ 6700 m$^2$ of Resistive Plate Chambers), the wide field of view ($\sim 2~$sr, limited only by the atmospheric absorption) and the high duty cycle ($>$ 86 %) make the ARGO-YBJ experiment particularly suitable to detect short and unexpected events like GRBs. With the scaler mode technique, i.e., counting all the particles hitting the detector with no measurement of the primary energy and arrival direction, the minimum threshold of $\sim$ 1 GeV can be reached, overlapping the direct measurements carried out by satellites. During the experiment lifetime, from December 17, 2004 to February 7, 2013, a total of 206 GRBs occurring within the ARGO-YBJ field of view (zenith angle $\theta$ $\le$ 45$^{\circ}$) have been analyzed. This is the largest sample of GRBs investigated with a ground-based detector. Two lightcurve models have been assumed and since in both cases no significant excess has been found, the corresponding fluence upper limits in the 1-100 GeV energy region have been derived, with values as low as 10$^{-5}~$erg cm$^{-2}$. The analysis of a subset of 24 GRBs with known redshift has been used to constrain the fluence extrapolation to the GeV region together with possible cutoffs under different assumptions on the spectrum.

Detectability of Planck-Scale-Induced Blurring with Gamma-Ray Bursts

Microscopic fluctuations inherent to the fuzziness of spacetime at the Planck scale might accumulate in wavefronts propagating a cosmological distance and lead to noticeable blurring in an image of a pointlike source. Distant quasars viewed in the optical and ultraviolet with Hubble Space Telescope (HST} may show this weakly, and if real suggests a stronger effect should be seen for Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) in X-rays and gamma-rays. Those telescopes, however, operate far from their diffraction limits. A description of how Planck-scale-induced blurring could be sensed at high energy, even with cosmic rays, while still agreeing with the HST results is discussed. It predicts dilated apparent source size and inflated uncertainties in positional centroids, effectively a threshold angular accuracy restricting knowledge of source location on the sky. These outcomes are found to be consistent with an analysis of the 10 highest-redshift GRB detections reported for the Fermi satellite. Confusion with photon cascade and scattering phenomena is also possible; prospects for a definitive multiwavelength measurement are considered.

A Correlation Between Optical, X-ray, and Gamma-ray Variations in Blazar 3C 454.3

We present the light curve data of a remarkable blazer 3C 454.3 (z=0.859) in optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray bands. Since January 2008, we have been monitoring this object using the 50 cm MITSuME, a optical telescope, and detected several flares including extraordinary and simultaneous flares in the $\gamma$-ray and optical bands in November 2010. Additionally, the Monitor of All-sky Image (MAXI) has been observing 3C 454.3 continuously since August 2009. Using these data and gamma-ray flux observed with Fermi-LAT, we discuss features and correlations of flux variations between the energy bands.

Decoupled Sectors and Wolf-Rayet Galaxies [Replacement]

The universe may contain several decoupled matter sectors which primarily couple through gravity to the Standard Model degrees of freedom. We focus here on the description of astrophysical environments that allow for comparable densities and spatial distributions of visible matter and decoupled dark matter. We discuss four Wolf-Rayet galaxies (NGC 1614, NGC 3367, NGC 4216 and NGC 5430) which should contain comparable amounts of decoupled dark and visible matter in the star forming regions. This could lead to the observation of Gamma Ray Burst events with physics modified by jets of dark matter radiation.

Decoupled Sectors and Wolf-Rayet Galaxies [Replacement]

The universe may contain several decoupled matter sectors which primarily couple through gravity to the Standard Model degrees of freedom. We focus here on the description of astrophysical environments that allow for comparable densities and spatial distributions of visible matter and decoupled dark matter. We discuss four Wolf-Rayet galaxies (NGC 1614, NGC 3367, NGC 4216 and NGC 5430) which should contain comparable amounts of decoupled dark and visible matter in the star forming regions. This could lead to the observation of Gamma Ray Burst events with physics modified by jets of dark matter radiation.

Decoupled Sectors and Wolf-Rayet Galaxies [Cross-Listing]

The universe may contain several decoupled matter sectors which primarily couple through gravity to the Standard Model degrees of freedom. We focus here on the description of astrophysical environments that allow for comparable densities and spatial distributions of visible matter and decoupled dark matter. We discuss four Wolf-Rayet galaxies (NGC 1614, NGC 3367, NGC 4216 and NGC 5430) which should contain comparable amounts of decoupled dark and visible matter in the star forming regions. This could lead to the observation of Gamma Ray Burst events with physics modified by jets of dark matter radiation.

Decoupled Sectors and Wolf-Rayet Galaxies [Cross-Listing]

The universe may contain several decoupled matter sectors which primarily couple through gravity to the Standard Model degrees of freedom. We focus here on the description of astrophysical environments that allow for comparable densities and spatial distributions of visible matter and decoupled dark matter. We discuss four Wolf-Rayet galaxies (NGC 1614, NGC 3367, NGC 4216 and NGC 5430) which should contain comparable amounts of decoupled dark and visible matter in the star forming regions. This could lead to the observation of Gamma Ray Burst events with physics modified by jets of dark matter radiation.

Decoupled Sectors and Wolf-Rayet Galaxies

The universe may contain several decoupled matter sectors which primarily couple through gravity to the Standard Model degrees of freedom. We focus here on the description of astrophysical environments that allow for comparable densities and spatial distributions of visible matter and decoupled dark matter. We discuss four Wolf-Rayet galaxies (NGC 1614, NGC 3367, NGC 4216 and NGC 5430) which should contain comparable amounts of decoupled dark and visible matter in the star forming regions. This could lead to the observation of Gamma Ray Burst events with physics modified by jets of dark matter radiation.

Decoupled Sectors and Wolf-Rayet Galaxies [Replacement]

The universe may contain several decoupled matter sectors which primarily couple through gravity to the Standard Model degrees of freedom. We focus here on the description of astrophysical environments that allow for comparable densities and spatial distributions of visible matter and decoupled dark matter. We discuss four Wolf-Rayet galaxies (NGC 1614, NGC 3367, NGC 4216 and NGC 5430) which should contain comparable amounts of decoupled dark and visible matter in the star forming regions. This could lead to the observation of Gamma Ray Burst events with physics modified by jets of dark matter radiation.

Fermi-LAT Detection of a Hard Spectrum Flare from the Gravitationally Lensed Blazar B0218+357

The Fermi-LAT has observed new gamma-ray flares from the blazar B0218+357 during July 2014. While no significant change in the gamma-ray spectrum has been previously observed through the flaring phase in late-2012, during this recent high activity the source displayed an exceptionally hard spectrum. The latter led to the detection of very high energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) gamma-rays from B0218+357 by the MAGIC telescopes, establishing this source as the most distant TeV emitter known to date. In addition to the detection of VHE emission, this blazar is of particular interest since it is known to be a double-image gravitationally lensed system with a lens delay of 11.46 +/- 0.16 days measured in gamma-rays. We present the Fermi-LAT study of the July 2014 flares and discuss them in the context of previous measurements.

Accessing the population of high redshift Gamma Ray Bursts

Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are a powerful probe of the high redshift Universe. We present a tool to estimate the detection rate of high-z GRBs by a generic detector with defined energy band and sensitivity. We base this on a population model that reproduces the observed properties of GRBs detected by Swift, Fermi and CGRO in the hard X-ray and gamma-ray bands. We provide the expected cumulative distributions of the flux and fluence of simulated GRBs in different energy bands. We show that scintillator detectors, operating at relatively high energies (e.g. tens of keV to the MeV), can detect only the most luminous GRBs at high redshifts due to the link between the peak spectral energy and the luminosity (Ep-Liso) of GRBs. We show that the best strategy for catching the largest number of high-z bursts is to go softer (e.g. in the soft X-ray band) but with a very high sensitivity. For instance, an imaging soft X-ray detector operating in the 0.2-5 keV energy band reaching a sensitivity, corresponding to a fluence of ~10^-8 erg cm^-2, is expected to detect ~40 GRBs yr^-1 sr^-1 at z>5 (~3 GRBs yr^-1 sr^-1 at z>10). Once high-z GRBs are detected the principal issue is to secure their redshift. To this aim we estimate their NIR afterglow flux at relatively early times and evaluate the effectiveness of following them up and construct usable samples of events with any forthcoming GRB mission dedicated to explore the high-z Universe.

Extending the Correlation of $L_R - L_X$ to Gamma Ray Bursts

The well-known correlation between the radio luminosity ($L_R$) and the X-ray luminosity ($L_X$) $L_R / L_X \simeq 10^{-5}$ holds for a variety of objects like active galactic nuclei, galactic black holes, solar flares and cool stars. Here we extend the relation to gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and find the GRBs also lay on the same $L_R-L_X$ relation, with a slightly different slope as $L_R \propto L_X^{1.1}$. This relation implies the explosions in different scales may have a common underlying origin.

The Extreme Gamma-Ray Blazar S5 0716+714: Jet Conditions from Radio-Band Variability and Radiative Transfer Modeling

As part of a program to identify the physical conditions in the jets of gamma-ray-flaring blazars detected by Fermi, including the role of shocks in the production of high-energy flaring, we obtained 4 years of 3-frequency, centimeter-band total flux density and linear polarization monitoring observations of the radio-bright blazar S5 0716+714 with the University of Michigan 26-m paraboloid. Light curves constructed from these data exhibit a series of rapid, high-amplitude, centimeter-band total flux density outbursts, and changes in the linear polarization consistent with the passage of shocks during the gamma-ray flaring. The observed spectral evolution of the radio-band flares, in combination with radiative transfer simulations incorporating propagating shocks, was used to constrain the shock and jet flow conditions in the parsec-scale regions of the jet. Eight forward-moving, transverse shocks with unusually-strong shock compression factors, a very fast Lorentz factor of the shocks of 77, a bulk Lorentz factor of the flow of 20, a viewing angle of 12 degrees, and an intrinsic opening angle of the radio jet of 5.2 degrees were identified.

Insights into the particle acceleration of a peculiar gamma -ray radio galaxy IC 310

IC 310 has recently been identified as a gamma-ray emitter based on observations at GeV energies with Fermi-LAT and at very high energies (VHE, E > 100 GeV) with the MAGIC telescopes. Despite IC 310 having been classified as a radio galaxy with the jet observed at an angle > 10 degrees, it exhibits a mixture of multiwavelength properties of a radio galaxy and a blazar, possibly making it a transitional object. On the night of 12/13th of November 2012 the MAGIC telescopes observed a series of violent outbursts from the direction of IC 310 with flux-doubling time scales faster than 5 min and a peculiar spectrum spreading over 2 orders of magnitude. Such fast variability constrains the size of the emission region to be smaller than 20% of the gravitational radius of its central black hole, challenging the shock acceleration models, commonly used in explanation of gamma-ray radiation from active galaxies. Here we will show that this emission can be associated with pulsar-like particle acceleration by the electric field across a magnetospheric gap at the base of the jet.

Extending LHC Coverage to Light Pseudoscalar Mediators and Coy Dark Sectors [Cross-Listing]

Many dark matter models involving weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) feature new, relatively light pseudoscalars that mediate dark matter pair annihilation into Standard Model fermions. In particular, simple models of this type can explain the gamma ray excess originating in the Galactic Center as observed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. In many cases the pseudoscalar’s branching ratio into WIMPs is suppressed, making these states challenging to detect at colliders through standard dark matter searches. Here, we study the prospects for observing these light mediator states at the LHC without exploiting missing energy techniques. While existing searches effectively probe pseudoscalars with masses between 5 – 14 GeV and above 90 GeV, the LHC reach can be extended to cover much of the interesting parameter space in the intermediate 20 – 80 GeV mass range in which the mediator can have appreciable Yukawa-like couplings to Standard Model fermions but would have escaped detection by LEP and other experiments. Models explaining the Galactic Center excess via a light pseudoscalar mediator can give rise to a promising signal in this regime through the associated production of the mediator with bottom quarks while satisfying all other existing constraints. We perform an analysis of the backgrounds and trigger efficiencies, detailing the cuts that can be used to extract the signal. A significant portion of the otherwise unconstrained parameter space of these models can be conclusively tested at the 13 TeV LHC with 100 fb$^{-1}$, and we encourage the ATLAS and CMS collaborations to extend their existing searches to this mass range.

Extending LHC Coverage to Light Pseudoscalar Mediators and Coy Dark Sectors

Many dark matter models involving weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) feature new, relatively light pseudoscalars that mediate dark matter pair annihilation into Standard Model fermions. In particular, simple models of this type can explain the gamma ray excess originating in the Galactic Center as observed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. In many cases the pseudoscalar’s branching ratio into WIMPs is suppressed, making these states challenging to detect at colliders through standard dark matter searches. Here, we study the prospects for observing these light mediator states at the LHC without exploiting missing energy techniques. While existing searches effectively probe pseudoscalars with masses between 5 – 14 GeV and above 90 GeV, the LHC reach can be extended to cover much of the interesting parameter space in the intermediate 20 – 80 GeV mass range in which the mediator can have appreciable Yukawa-like couplings to Standard Model fermions but would have escaped detection by LEP and other experiments. Models explaining the Galactic Center excess via a light pseudoscalar mediator can give rise to a promising signal in this regime through the associated production of the mediator with bottom quarks while satisfying all other existing constraints. We perform an analysis of the backgrounds and trigger efficiencies, detailing the cuts that can be used to extract the signal. A significant portion of the otherwise unconstrained parameter space of these models can be conclusively tested at the 13 TeV LHC with 100 fb$^{-1}$, and we encourage the ATLAS and CMS collaborations to extend their existing searches to this mass range.

Limits on Dark Matter Annihilation Signals from the Fermi LAT 4-year Measurement of the Isotropic Gamma-Ray Background

We search for evidence of dark matter (DM) annihilation in the isotropic gamma-ray background (IGRB) measured with 50 months of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) observations. An improved theoretical description of the cosmological DM annihilation signal, based on two complementary techniques and assuming generic weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) properties, renders more precise predictions compared to previous work. More specifically, we estimate the cosmologically-induced gamma-ray intensity to have an uncertainty of a factor ~20 in canonical setups. We consistently include both the Galactic and extragalactic signals under the same theoretical framework, and study the impact of the former on the IGRB spectrum derivation. We find no evidence for a DM signal and we set limits on the DM-induced isotropic gamma-ray signal. Our limits are competitive for DM particle masses up to tens of TeV and, indeed, are the strongest limits derived from Fermi LAT data at TeV energies. This is possible thanks to the new Fermi LAT IGRB measurement, which now extends up to an energy of 820 GeV. We quantify uncertainties in detail and show the potential this type of search offers for testing the WIMP paradigm with a complementary and truly cosmological probe of DM particle signals.

Propagation of quantum particles in Brans-Dicke spacetime. The case of Gamma Ray Bursts [Cross-Listing]

The propagation of boson particles in a gravitational field described by the Brans-Dicke theory of gravity is analyzed. We derive the wave function of the scalar particles, and the effective potential experienced by the quantum particles considering the role of the varying gravitational coupling. Besides, we calculate the probability to find the scalar particles near the region where a naked singularity is present. The extremely high energy radiated in such a situation could account for the huge emitted power observed in Gamma Ray Bursts.

Propagation of quantum particles in Brans-Dicke spacetime. The case of Gamma Ray Bursts [Cross-Listing]

The propagation of boson particles in a gravitational field described by the Brans-Dicke theory of gravity is analyzed. We derive the wave function of the scalar particles, and the effective potential experienced by the quantum particles considering the role of the varying gravitational coupling. Besides, we calculate the probability to find the scalar particles near the region where a naked singularity is present. The extremely high energy radiated in such a situation could account for the huge emitted power observed in Gamma Ray Bursts.

Propagation of quantum particles in Brans-Dicke spacetime. The case of Gamma Ray Bursts

The propagation of boson particles in a gravitational field described by the Brans-Dicke theory of gravity is analyzed. We derive the wave function of the scalar particles, and the effective potential experienced by the quantum particles considering the role of the varying gravitational coupling. Besides, we calculate the probability to find the scalar particles near the region where a naked singularity is present. The extremely high energy radiated in such a situation could account for the huge emitted power observed in Gamma Ray Bursts.

Evidence of coupling between the thermal and nonthermal emission in the gamma-ray binary LS I +61 303

The gamma-ray binary LS I +61 303 is composed of a Be star and a compact companion orbiting in an eccentric orbit. Variable flux modulated with the orbital period of ~26.5 d has been detected from radio to very high-energy gamma rays. In addition, the system presents a superorbital variability of the phase and amplitude of the radio outburst with a period of ~4.6 yr. We present optical photometric observations of LS I +61 303 spanning ~1.5 yr and contemporaneous Halpha equivalent width (EW Halpha) data. The optical photometry shows, for the first time, that the known orbital modulation suffers a positive orbital phase shift and an increase in flux for data obtained 1-yr apart. This behavior is similar to that already known at radio wavelengths, indicating that the optical flux follows the superorbital variability as well. The orbital modulation of the EW Halpha presents the already known superorbital flux variability but shows, also for the first time, a positive orbital phase shift. In addition, the optical photometry exhibits a lag of ~0.1-0.2 in orbital phase with respect to the EW Halpha measurements at similar superorbital phases, and presents a lag of ~0.1 and ~0.3 orbital phases with respect noncontemperaneous radio and X-ray outbursts, respectively. The phase shifts detected in the orbital modulation of thermal indicators, such as the optical flux and the EW Halpha, are in line with the observed behavior for nonthermal indicators, such as X-ray or radio emission. This shows that there is a strong coupling between the thermal and nonthermal emission processes in the gamma-ray binary LS I +61 303. The orbital phase lag between the optical flux and the EW Halpha is naturally explained considering different emitting regions in the circumstellar disk, whereas the secular evolution might be caused by the presence of a moving one-armed spiral density wave in the disk.

Evidence of coupling between the thermal and nonthermal emission in the gamma-ray binary LS I +61 303 [Replacement]

The gamma-ray binary LS I +61 303 is composed of a Be star and a compact companion orbiting in an eccentric orbit. Variable flux modulated with the orbital period of ~26.5 d has been detected from radio to very high-energy gamma rays. In addition, the system presents a superorbital variability of the phase and amplitude of the radio outburst with a period of ~4.6 yr. We present optical photometric observations of LS I +61 303 spanning ~1.5 yr and contemporaneous Halpha equivalent width (EW Halpha) data. The optical photometry shows, for the first time, that the known orbital modulation suffers a positive orbital phase shift and an increase in flux for data obtained 1-yr apart. This behavior is similar to that already known at radio wavelengths, indicating that the optical flux follows the superorbital variability as well. The orbital modulation of the EW Halpha presents the already known superorbital flux variability but shows, also for the first time, a positive orbital phase shift. In addition, the optical photometry exhibits a lag of ~0.1-0.2 in orbital phase with respect to the EW Halpha measurements at similar superorbital phases, and presents a lag of ~0.1 and ~0.3 orbital phases with respect noncontemperaneous radio and X-ray outbursts, respectively. The phase shifts detected in the orbital modulation of thermal indicators, such as the optical flux and the EW Halpha, are in line with the observed behavior for nonthermal indicators, such as X-ray or radio emission. This shows that there is a strong coupling between the thermal and nonthermal emission processes in the gamma-ray binary LS I +61 303. The orbital phase lag between the optical flux and the EW Halpha is naturally explained considering different emitting regions in the circumstellar disk, whereas the secular evolution might be caused by the presence of a moving one-armed spiral density wave in the disk.

 

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